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Moisture Management Education

Education

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Water gets into buildings. It’s an indisputable reality. The effects of inward driven moisture can wreak havoc on the structural integrity, durability and longevity of any building. The aftermath leaves homeowners and property managers struggling to fix problems including rot, mold and mildew. For architects and builders, failing to identify these potential risks and specify solutions to mitigate them can become a significant issue in renovation, as well as in litigation. The marketplace is...

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Open joint rainscreen cladding is a growing trend in exterior facades. The design concept relies on the performance benefits of a rainscreen, which is a gap behind cladding that facilitates drainage and drying. The open joint allows some incidental water to enter the rainscreen gap, but also promotes enhanced airflow to increase the drying rate. This creates a low-risk wall assembly to the potential damaging effects of moisture. The downside of the open joint design is that areas of the...

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​Moisture is the number one cause of exterior wall damage. Drainage is widely accepted as one of the most effective measures for reducing moisture damage due to rain penetration. Drainage is a critical component in allowing the housewrap to do its job – particularly in keeping walls dry. According to a study by John Straube and Jonathan Smegal of Building Science Corporation, a 1mm drainage gap “will drain water at a rate considerably greater than rainwater is expected to penetrate behind...

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​A rainscreen system, such as our Slicker family, was designed for regions of the country prone to wind-driven rain, excessive amounts of rainfall, or high temperature and humidity. Wind-driven rain from the outside and moisture vapor from the home’s interior, often remain trapped in the sidewall assembly. Left alone, this moisture can promote the growth of mold and undermine the structural integrity of the wall. For wet and/or humid climates, coastal areas and hilltop exposures...

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Yes, you can use Cedar Breather for side wall applications under your siding material. Similar to our Slicker Rainscreen, Cedar Breather maintains a 1/4” gap to promote airflow and ventilation. The difference between Slicker and Cedar Breather resides in the color and manufacturing process. Slicker is yellow and contains vertical channels designed to promote drainage. Cedar Breather is black and has a conical shape pattern to promote circulation under cedar roofing materials. Depending...

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Slicker products are faster and easier to install, cutting labor costs. Slicker products provide a continuous vented airspace over the entire surface area of the wall, providing greater drainage and more effective drying than wood strapping which only vents approximately 85% of the wall. (1x3 strapping installed 16 inches on center leaves 15% of the wall unventilated.) Unlike wood furring that is subject to saturation and decomposition in a relatively short period of time, Slicker...

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The main difference between HydroGap Drainable Housewrap and Slicker Classic rainscreen is the size of the gap that each provides. Both allow water to drain, but Slicker Rainscreen offers ventilation that promotes drying. Slicker Classic is a true rainscreen, meaning that it provides a 1/4-inch (6mm) gap between the sheathing and the cladding. This 1/4-inch gap provides for both drainage AND continuous airflow (drying). Slicker Classic by itself does not act as a WRB (water-resistive...

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A drainable housewrap, like HydroGap, incorporates both a water-resistive layer and a drainage gap, greatly facilitating water drainage from behind the exterior siding. Unlike typical housewraps, which provide only a water-resistive layer and can trap water behind siding, drainable housewraps provide a continuous drainage gap that allows water to quickly escape from the wall system, protecting the building enclosure. There is growing recognition that walls systems need to drain, and...

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May 18 2016

What is a Rainscreen?

A rainscreen, like our Slicker products, is essentially a 1/4-to-3/4-inch air gap built in-between the the exterior siding and sheathing of a wall assembly. When combined with a WRB, a rainscreen is designed to reduce the forces that draw water into the your sheathing. Water that does reach the back of the cladding is permitted to drain from the wall assembly via the space created by the rainscreen. A rainscreen offers accelerated drying of water vapor that accumulates in-between the siding...

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​Many homes are improperly or inadequately ventilated even when some form of ventilation is installed. Signs of improper ventilation include: Damp insulation Unnaturally dark or discolored decking Dark streaks on roof boards around nails Orange resin beads on rafters signaling sweating wood Moisture on roof boards & rafters Crumbling, curled roof shingles Adequate roof venting, properly installed helps pull fresh air into the attic and pushes heat and...

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